CORAL RESTORATION

Restoring impacted coral reefs

PASSIVE AND ACTIVE

Using a range of methods suited for each environment

RESTORING REEFS BACK TO LIFE

COMBINING SIMPLE TECHNIQUES WITH EXPERT KNOWLEDGE

Junkyard Dome
Coral maintenance
Coral damage by anchor

Coral reefs are damaged due to changing water temperatures, ocean acidification, pollution, invasive species, changing weather patterns, and physical impacts.

It is estimated that the world has lost 30 to 50 percent of its coral reefs already.

By creating an artificial reefs we’re assisting nature by providing an alternative dive site and providing substrate for coral transplants and for natural recruits

HOW DOES IT WORK ?

Preparation

Active Coral Restoration requires extensive knowledge, training and permission before taking part.

Diving

Coral Restoration (active and passive) can be conducted on most dives. Cleaning, repairing, monitoring etc.

Transplanting

Coral transplantation can only be conducted by DMCR approved divers in certain locations, but volunteers can help.

Long Term

Areas have to be monitored and maintained regularly to assess or improve coral reef area. Without this, restoration rarely succeeds.

WHY CORAL RESTORATION ?

DMCR presentation

By utilizing corals that have either been broken by natural causes, fish, divers, we’re giving them a chance of survival by securing them to a solid structure using a wide variety of techniques.

Corals secured in an area where the physical conditions are conducive for growth will thrive as long as it’s secure, eventually contributing to the framework of the artificial reef enticing other marine life to it.

However, planting corals is just part of our holistic approach.

CORAL RESTORATION FACTS

Without significant intervention, tropical reef ecosystems could face global extinction by the end of the century.

Charles Darwin was the world’s first coral restorationist by securing broken coral fragments in bamboo.

Transplants from our coral nurseries end up on artificial structures or back on the natural reef.

Regular maintenance is required to ensure transplants have a high survival rate.

Coral growth

GET INVOLVED !

Girls on speedboat
Happy Pufferfish
Close up table coral

A lot of  time, energy, and resources are devoted to the maintenance of coral restoration projects.

There is always a neverending list of jobs to do to ensure fragments have the highest survival rate.

We try to ensure that we have a diverse range of corals. The more diverse, the more resilient they will be to be able to withstand or recover from disturbances.

Join a Marine Conservation Internship to get involved with coral restoration.

GET MORE INFO !

If you have questions, about any of our projects, citizen science, research, volunteering, internships or training.

Please get in touch with us!

3 + 10 =